Ancient Baroda.

  Raj Kumar
  karma level 71193


Hunting Cheetas at Baroda - 1895

Photograph of a group of three cheetahs with handlers at Baroda, Gujarat from the Curzon Collection, taken by an unknown photographer during the 1890s. Hunting with cheetahs was one of several royal sports traditionally favoured by Indian princes and continued during the 19th century. These animals belonged to the Gaekwar Sayaji Rao III (ruled 1875-1939), 12th Maharaja of Baroda.

Durbar hall in the palace at Makarpura, Baroda - 1895

Photograph of the durbar hall in the new palace at Makarpura, near Baroda, Gujarat from the Curzon Collection, taken by an unknown photographer during the 1890s. The palace was built by the Gaekwar Sayaji Rao III (ruled 1875-1939) between 1883-1890 as a country residence, and designed by Robert Fellowes Chisholm (1840-1915) in an Italian Renaissance style.

Elephant with a golden ambari at Baroda - 1895
Photograph of an elephant with a golden ambari at Baroda, Gujarat from the Curzon Collection, taken by an unknown photographer during the 1890s. The elephant was one of about 55 state elephants owned by the Gaekwar Sayaji Rao III (ruled 1875-1939), 12th Maharaja of Baroda. They were used in ceremonial processions and were granted to high officials as a mark of royal favour. In this side view, the elephant is caparisoned in cloth of gold and bears on its back the ambari, a throne or state howdah made of gold which only the largest and strongest elephants could support.
Makarpura Palace, Baroda - 1895
Photograph of the Makarpura Palace, near Baroda, Gujarat from the Curzon Collection, taken by an unknown photographer during the 1890s. The palace was built by the Gaekwar Sayaji Rao III (ruled 1875-1939) between 1883-1890 and designed by Robert Fellowes Chisholm (1840-1915) in an Italian Renaissance style. It lies to the south of Baroda and was used as a country residence. This view shows the front façade, consisting of two three-storey wings arcaded with semi-circular arches, linked by a central arcade and tower. The palace is surrounded by English-style formal gardens, shown in the foreground.

Zenana ( Girls) school at Baroda - 1895
Photograph of a zenana school at Baroda, Gujarat from the Curzon Collection, taken by an unknown photographer during the 1890s. The Department of Public Instruction was opened in 1875 and a policy of free, compulsory education for both sexes and all castes was pursued by the state government with the encouragement of the Gaekwar Maharaja Sayaji Rao III (ruled 1875-1939). The Gaekwar particularly valued the education of women and in 1885 published a memorandum on the subject. A girls’ schools was opened in Baroda in 1875, and by 1880 there were eight throughout the state. In addition a training college for women teachers was opened in 1882. Zenana classes were attended by grown-up women who were taught reading, writing, arithmetic and needlework. This view of the school shows a brick building built in an Anglo-Indian style.

State Library at Baroda - 1895

Photograph of the State Library at Baroda, Gujarat from the Curzon Collection, taken by an unknown photographer during the 1890s. The library was built in 1876 and designed by Major Charles Mant (1840-81) in the Indo-Saracenic style. He was a pioneer of the style and used it in his designs for other civic and state buildings in Baroda such as the Countess of Dufferin hospital and his masterpiece, the Lakshmi Vilas Palace. The library is one of the public offices contained within the Juni Kothi or old fort. It predates the Baroda Library movement initiated in c.1910 by the Gaekwar Maharaja Sayaji Rao III (ruled 1875-1939), which founded the Central Library, a system of state-aided libraries, reading rooms, travelling libraries and the first library school in India.

Library at Lakshmi Vilas Palace in Baroda - 1895
Photograph of the library at Lakshmi Vilas Palace in Baroda, Gujarat from the Curzon Collection, taken by an unknown photographer during the 1890s. An immense structure, the palace was built for the Gaekwar Sayaji Rao III (ruled 1875-1939) and was reputedly the most expensive building erected by a private individual in the 19th century. Originally designed and begun in 1880 by Major Charles Mant (1840-81), it was completed in 1890 by Robert Fellowes Chisholm (1840-1915). Both architects were pioneers of the Indo-Saracenic style, an orientalist fusion of Eastern and Western forms. The interior was richly decorated with lavish ornamental detail in this style but was planned and furnished in a largely Western manner, as shown in this view of the library. The Gaekwar’s library consisted of c.20,000 volumes which he donated in 1910 to form the nucleus of the Baroda Central Library. This was established as part of the Baroda Library movement, a campaign to found free state libraries initiated by the Gaekwar.

Group portrait of Sir Madava Rao and ministers of Baroda - 1880
Photograph of a group portrait of Indian office holders from the state of Baroda (Vadodara) from the 'Album of portraits and views in Baroda' taken by an unknown photographer in c.1880. Seen in this group portrait is Sir Madhava T. Rao, the British appointed administrator or Chief Minister to the Princely state of Baroda. The state of Baroda (Vadodara) in Gujarat, western India was ruled by the Gaekwads from 1734 till Indian Independence. In 1802 a treaty was concluded between the Gaekwar and East India Company by which a British Resident was appointed to the court and a provision was made for the maintenance of a British military force in the state.
Maharaja Sayajirao Gaekwad III of Baroda - 1919
Maharaja Sayajirao Gaekwad III of Baroda

Laxmi Vilas Palace, Baroda - 1890

Photograph of the Lakshmi Vilas Palace, at Baroda in Gujarat, from Lee-Warner Collection: 'Baroda views and buildings, c.1890' taken by an unknown photographer. A colossal structure, it was built for the Gaekwar Sayaji Rao III (r.1875-1939) and was reputedly the most expensive building erected by a private individual in the 19th century. This is a general view of the west facade shortly after completion, with landscaped gardens in the foreground. Originally designed by Major Charles Mant (1840-81) in an exuberant Indo-Saracenic architectural style, it was begun in 1878 and completed after his death in 1890 by Robert Fellowes Chisholm (1840-1915). Both architects were pioneers of the Orientalist style, which combined western and eastern forms, particularly arches and domes. The skyline of the palace is a fantastical mixture of bangaldar eaves, chhatris, a tall tower and a central cupola. In creating a modern palace, Mant retained the traditional division of an Indian palace into three sections but arrayed them in three blocks along the main axis of the building. The Durbar Hall is at the left, the Maharaja's residence in the centre and the zenana or women’s apartments at the right.

Side view, Makarpura Palace, Baroda - 1890
Photograph of the Makarpura Palace, near Baroda in Gujarat, from the Lee-Warner Collection: 'Baroda views and buildings, c.1890', taken by an unknown photographer.

Old & new Palace, Makarpura, Baroda - 1890


Photograph of the old and new palaces at Makarpura, near Baroda in Gujarat, from the Lee-Warner Collection: 'Baroda views and buildings, c.1890', taken by an unknown photographer. Situated to the south of Baroda, the palaces were built by the Gaekwad Maharajas as country residences. They are surrounded by English-style formal gardens containing pergolas, fountains, and grottoes. The old palace was originally built by Khande Rao (r.1856-1870) . The retreat was enlarged and improved when the new palace, at right, was built by the Gaekwar Sayaji Rao III (r.1875-1939) between 1883-1890. It was designed by Robert Fellowes Chisholm (1840-1915) in an Italian Renaissance style and is connected to the old palace by a central corridor. This view shows the rear of the old palace in the foreground, with balconies and steps leading down to the gardens, and the arcaded classical facade of the new palace beyond.

Elephant with golden howdah, Baroda - 1890

Photograph of an elephant with a golden ambari at Baroda in Gujarat, from the Lee-Warner Collection: 'Baroda views and buildings, c.1890' taken by an unknown photographer. The elephant was one of about 55 state elephants owned by the Gaekwar Sayaji Rao III (r.1875-1939) , 12th Maharaja of Baroda. They were used in ceremonial processions and were granted to high officials as a mark of royal favour. In this side view, the elephant is shown caparisoned in cloth of gold and bears on its back the ambari, a throne or state howdah made of gold which only the largest and strongest elephants could support.

State procession in Baroda (Second View) - 1880
 Photograph of a State procession in Baroda (Vadodara) from an 'Album of portraits and views in Baroda' taken by an unknown photographer in c. 1880.
Street scene in Baroda - 1880

Photograph of a a street scene in Baroda (Vadodara) from an 'Album of portraits and views in Baroda' taken by an unknown photographer in c. 1880. Vadodara, on the banks of the river Vishwamitri, was capital of the princely state of Baroda from 1734 to1947 under the Gaekwads who transformed the city into a progressive centre of education, culture and industry.

State procession in Baroda - 1880

Photograph of a State procession in Baroda (Vadodara) from an 'Album of portraits and views in Baroda' taken by an unknown photographer in c. 1880. Vadodara, on the banks of the river Vishwamitri, was capital of the princely state of Baroda from 1734 till 1947 under the Gaekwads who transformed the city into a progressive centre of education, culture and industry. In 1802 a treaty was concluded between the Gaekwar and East India Company by which a British Resident was appointed to the court and a provision was made for the maintenance of a British military force in the state. After Indian independence the city became a part of the Bombay state and in 1960 of the state of Gujarat. This is a view looking down a street during a State procession in Baroda (Vadodara).

Tarabai, Jamna Bai and Gaekwar of Baroda - 1880

Photograph from the 'Album of portraits and views in Baroda' taken by an unknown phtographer in c.1880. This group portrait shows Her Highness the Maharani Jamnabai (the widowed consort of Khande Rao who adopted Sayaji Rao) sitting on a chair with the Gaekwar behind and to her left and Tarabai (possibly the Gaekwar's sister) standing at her right side.

Portrait of Sir Sayaji Rao The Gaekwar of Baroda - 1880

Photograph of Sir Sayaji Rao, Gaekwar of Baroda (Vadodara) from the 'Album of portraits and views in Baroda' taken by an unknown photographer in c.1880.

Group portrait with the Gaekwar of Baroda, the Governor of Bombay, Sir Richard Temple and various Indian and European officials - 1880

Photographer: Unknown

Group portrait of Sir Sayaji Rao, the young Gaekwar of Baroda (seated, front centre), Sir Richard Temple, Governor of Bombay and officials from the 'Album of portraits and views in Baroda' taken by an unknown photographer in c.1880. Also in the portrait Sir Madhav T Rao, British appointed administrator of Baroda and Phillip S. Melville, Agent to the Governor General. The state of Baroda (Vadodara) in Gujarat, western India was ruled by the Gaekwads from 1734 till Indian Independence. In 1802 a treaty was concluded between the Gaekwar and East India Company by which a British Resident was appointed to the court and a provision was made for the maintenance of a British military force in the state.

Maharajah Sayaji Rao Gaekwar of Baroda - 1875

Photograph by Bourne and Shepherd

Photograph Sir Sayaji Rao, Gaekwar of Baroda, from the 'Album of portraits and views in Baroda' taken by Bourne & Shepherd in November 1875. The Full-length portrait of Sir Sayaji Rao, the young Gaekwar of Baroda (Vadodara) is taken a few months after his accession to the throne of Baroda on 27 May, 1875. The state of Vadodara in Gujarat, western India was ruled by the Gaekwads from 1734 to 1947. The rule of Sayaji Rao (r.1875-1939) was characterised by unprecedented progress and reform. He initiated a number of social reforms and paid great attention to the economic development of the state. He founded modern textile and tile factories and it is largely due to his policies that Vadodara is today one of the most important centres for the textile, chemical and oil industries in India. In order to develop education he introduced compulsory primary schooling, a library system for adult education and founded the Maharaja Sayajirao University of Vadodara.

The Maharaja of Indore at the Delhi Darbar of 1877



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